Fasteners Range By SA Mining Supplies

We stock an extensive range of both standard and specialised fasteners, ensuring that our breakdown response service is prompt. If we don't have it we will source it. We manufacture standard and custom fasteners to our clients specifications in either Steel, Stainless Steel, Brass & more.

Our Standard Fastener Range



Industrial fasteners are hardware that is used to hold materials together. This category is incredibly broad; over 500,000 types of hardware fall under the fastener umbrella. Across industrial and commercial settings, fasteners are used in literally thousands of applications. They do everything from holding cars together, to connecting building structures, to securing orthopedic implants.


Design

Materials
Fasteners are usually made of metal, but in some applications, they are simply made of plastic. Most metal fasteners are manufactured from steel, stainless steel, brass, bronze, or titanium.

Steel is a formable, strong, and durable iron alloy. Steel fasteners are popular for use with a wide variety of applications, depending on their carbon content.

Stainless steel is an extra durable alloy steel. It is popular choice for many industries, such as automotive engineering, because these stainless-steel fasteners are strong and resistant to corrosion.

Brass is a light duty alloy of copper and zinc. It is strong, corrosion resistant, and quite an attractive yellow color. Manufacturers usually use brass screws to secure decorative pieces, functional items they want to look nice, and for items to be used in or near seawater.

Bronze is another light duty copper alloy. This time, it is alloyed with zinc. Bronze alloys are ductile, lightweight, good conductors of heat and electricity, and corrosion resistant. Like brass, they have a nice color and sheen, though it can tarnish over time. Bronze fasteners can be used for applications very similar to brass.

Titanium fasteners are the number one choice for the aerospace industry because they are durable enough to be used as airplane construction fasteners. They are also extremely lightweight and strong.


Considerations and Customization
When designing or assigning fasteners for their customers, fastener manufacturers consider several important variables. These include the weight that the fastener will be expected to bear, the environmental conditions, and the space limitations.



These variables help manufacturers choose and customize details like the head type, the length, the fastener material, necessary coatings, screw grade strength, and decorative components. They will also decide on threads, or lack thereof, thread texture (coarse threads, smooth threads, etc.), and thread measurements.


These details are all important for different reasons. First, the head type makes a difference, as a wider head offers force on a greater surface area. Next, the correct length ensures that the fastener is flush with the surface. Third, because most outdoor applications require fasteners that will resist corrosion and ultraviolet deterioration, manufacturers must often apply protective coatings. Fourth, in machinery, manufacturers choose the strength grade that will keep the fastener from experiencing breakage or failure during operation. Next, when a fastener is used decoratively or fastens a decorative piece, manufacturers must make sure they choose a fastener that will not expose the head. Finally, threads largely dictate how the fastener will function.

Types

For the best organization, we can divide industrial fasteners into two overarching groups: threaded fasteners and non-threaded fasteners.

Threaded Fasteners

Threaded fasteners are those fasteners that feature spiral ridges, called threads, on their body. Threads help them stay secure.

Prominent examples of thread fasteners included nuts, bolts, screws, studs, clinching fasteners, hex bolts, self-tapping screws, cap screws, tap-end studs, double-end studs, and continuous-thread studs.

Nuts are metal blocks designed to work with bolts in order to create a strong attachment between the joining surfaces. To do so, they use internal threads that fit and hold onto the upper shaft of bolts.

Bolts (bolt stud fasteners) , the counterpart of nuts, feature an external, partially threaded shaft. Users push them through the workpiece and secure them on the other side with nuts. Together nuts and bolts are known as nut and bolt assemblies.

Screws are an extremely broad category of externally threaded fasteners. In general, they feature a spiral shaped thread shaft and a head. Since they feature a head, they do not need any other hardware to stay in place.

Studs are metal shafts or rods with threads on both sides.

Clinching fasteners, sometimes called clinch fasteners, self-clinching fasteners, or captive fasteners, are fasteners that when driven into ductile metal, deform the metal around the workpiece mounting hole. When they do so, the displaced metal cold flows into an annular recess located in the fastener pilot or shank. Clinching fasteners contrast with those fasteners that deform when they are installed.

Hex bolts are bolts that feature a hexagon shaped head. They are common for use in construction.

Self-tapping screws can tap their own hole as a user drives them into place.

Cap screws are fully threaded fasteners designed to fasten machine parts.

Tap-end studs are studs that feature long threads on one end and short ends on the other. The long end is called a nut-end. Users can round or chamfer the long end, and they can screw the short end into tapped holes.

Double-end studs are those studs that feature chamfered points and threads of equal lengths on both ends. Most often, customers purchase this type of fastener for flange bolting.

Continuous thread studs are studs that have no break in their threading. Rather, they are threaded continuously from end to end. Customers also often use continuous thread studs for flange bolting, though to do so, they must also use two nuts.


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